The Differences Between SodaStream Models

Many people want to get a SodaStream but have no idea which model is best for them. It can be difficult to choose, especially when the SodaStream company has no information highlighting the differences between the models. Here is a brief overview explaining which features are unique to the models.

There are currently eight SodaStream models available. They are The Revolution, The Source, The Fizz, The Crystal, The Pure, The Fountain Jet, The Dynamo and The Genesis. First, let's address the similarities of all eight types. All of the eight models can make soda or sparkling water in the convenience of your home. All come with "stay fizzy" bottle closures that keep the carbonation in longer. All are compatible with the standard 14.5 ounce carbonation cylinder which is capable of carbonating up to sixty liters of soda or sparkling water.

There are four models which are capable of using either the 14.5 ounce carbonation cylinder or the larger 33 ounce cylinder, which is capable of carbonating up to 130 liters of soda or sparkling water. These four models are The Revolution, The Dynamo, The Fountain Jet and The Fizz.

All eight models use the CO2 tank as a power source to carbonate. The Crystal, The Pure, The Dynamo, The Fountain Jet and The Genesis require no additional power source to operate. The Fizz and The Source do require a battery to operate the display components. That battery is included. The Revolution is the only model which requires electricity to work. Keep this in mind, as it will need to be near an outlet when used.

The Crystal comes with a dishwasher safe glass carafe. The other seven models come with BPA-free plastic bottles that are not dishwasher safe. You can buy dishwasher safe bottles separately that are compatible with those seven models, but you can not use the glass carafe with any model other than the Crystal.

The Dynamo, The Fountain Jet, The Pure, The Fizz and The Genesis all require the user to twist the bottle into place. The Crystal, The Revolution and The Source all lock the bottle into place without twisting, making them a little easier to use.

There is only one fully automated SodaStream available at this time. That is The Revolution. You simply press a button to tell it how carbonated you would like your drink and it does the rest for you. It also measures the CO2 levels to let you know how much is left in your carbonation cylinder. The Fizz is not automated but it does monitor and display the amount of carbonation in your drink as well as the level of CO2 in your cylinder. The Source has three LED lights to let you know how much carbonation is in your drink, but does not monitor the CO2 left in your cylinder.

I hope I have shed some light on what makes each SodaStream model unique. Click HERE for more information on SodaStreams and to see how the different models look. Remember, this will probably sit on your counter at all times, so you'll want something that looks good in your kitchen.

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What is SSL (the "little padlock")?

SSL ("Secured Socket Layer") is a protocol used to encrypt the communication between the user's browser and the web server. When SSL is active, a "little padlock" appears on the user's browser, usually in the status line at the bottom (at the top for Mac / Safari users.)

This assures the user that sensitive data (such as credit card numbers) can not be viewed by anyone "sniffing" the network connection (which is an increasing risk as more people use wireless networking).

Common web site owner questions about SSL:

How do I get the little padlock on my site?

To get the little padlock, your site must have an SSL Certificate from a Certificate Authority. Once an SSL Certificate has been purchased and installed, it provides three things:

  1. The ability to show a page in "Secure Mode", which encrypts the traffic between the browser and the server, as indicated by the "little padlock" on the user's browser.
  2. A guarantee by the issuing Certificate Authority that the domain name the certificate was issued for is indeed owned by the specific company or individual named in the certificate (visible if the user clicks on the little padlock).
  3. An assurance that the domain name the certificate was issued for is the domain name the user's browser is now on.

Once obtained, the certificate must be installed on the web server by your web host. Since your web host also has to generate an initial cypher key to obtain the certificate, very often they will offer to handle the process of obtaining the certificate for you.

My web host has a "shared certificate" that I can use. Should I?

It's still fairly common for small sites to use a shared certificate from the host. In this circumstance, when a page needs to be shown in secured mode, the user is actually sent to a domain owned by the web host, and then back to the originating domain afterwards.

A few years ago, when SSL Certificates were quite expensive (around $ 400 per year), this was real attractive for new sites just getting their feet wet in e-commerce. Today, with a number of perfectly functional SSL certificates available for under $ 100 (exclusive of installation, etc.), it is a lot less attractive. Since your user can look at the address line of his or her web browser and see that the site asking for the credit card number is not the site he or she thought they were on, the cost savings is probably not worth the risk of scaring off A sale.

What's the difference between the expensive SSL Certificates and the inexpensive ones?

Usually, mostly price. Some expensive certificates have specific functions, such as securing a number of different subdomains simultaneously (a "wildcard" certificate), but the effective differences between basic single site certificates are very slight, despite the wide range of prices:

The encryption mechanism used by all of them is the same, and most use the same key length (which is an indicator of the strength of the encryption) common to most browsers (128 bit).

Some of them ("chained root" certificates) are slightly more of a pain for your web host to install than others ("single root" certificates), but this is pretty much invisible to the site owner.

The amount of actual checking on the ownership of the domain varies wildly among sellers, with some (usually the more expensive) wanting significant documentation (like a D & B number), and others handling it with an automated phone call ("press # 123 if you 'Ve just ordered a certificate ").

Some of them offer massive monetary guarantees as to their security (we'll pay you oodles of dollars if someone cracks this code), but since it's all the same encryption mechanism, if someone comes up with a crack, all e-commerce sites will Be scrambling, and the odds of that vendor actually having enough cash to pay all of its customers their oodel is probably slim.

The fact is that you are buying the certificate to insure the safety of the user's data, and to make the user confident that his or her data is secure. For the vast majority of users, simply having the little padlock show up is all they are looking for. There are exceptions (I have a client in the bank software business, and they feel that their customers (bank officers) are looking for a specific premier name on the SSL certificate, so are happy to continue using the expensive one), but most e -commerce customers do not pick their sellers based on who issued their SSL Certificates.

My advice is to buy the cheaper one.

I have an SSL certificate – why should not I serve all my pages in "Secured" mode?

Because SSL has an overhead – more data is sent with a page that is encrypted than a page that is not. This translates to your site appearing to run slower, particularly for users who are on dial-up or other slow connections. Since this also increases the total amount of data transferred by your site, if your web host charges by transfer volume (or has an overage fee, as most do), this can increase the size of your monthly hosting bill.

The server should go into secure mode when asking a user for financial or other sensitive data (which may well be "name, address and phone number", with today's risk of identity theft), and operate in normal mode otherwise.

Internet Marketing Systems Cost Money – Read This First

Who Am I

I'm not going to attempt the normal practice you'll see all over the internet, and especially when being sold Internet Marketing systems, of telling you how poor I was and how cold it was living under a bridge in New York. I do not believe any of that any more, having read it in almost every other sales pitch on the 'net. No; I'm an ordinary healthy bloke, nearly fifty, married with two kids, and four grandschildren. I am very blessed to live in New Zealand, own the home, drive a nice car, have plenty of work as an independent contractor, and am priviledged to fly the old DC-3 Dakota for fun.

So why am I getting into Internet Marketing? Because I have ten to 15 years of useful working life left, before my value to my customer base diminishes. Nobody wants to engage old farts, and there is no leverage in selling my time. When I take a day off, a day's pay is lost – for good! While I do do the good life, I do have debt and do not wish to retire that by selling assets. I am determined to pay off all the debt, while also enjoying my lifestyle, and more. I want to replace my income, and boost it!

Internet Marketing Costs Money

If you are down to your last five bucks, go buy a lottery ticket! You will not turn your luck around on the internet, and establishing yourself on the net is going to cost money. I'll be honest, I've spent in the order of $ 2,500 on cost per click (CPC) marketing maybe two years ago, to make $ 40 after several months which I never collected; And another $ 800 – 1,000 in the last three weeks getting started up again. I'll be honest, I've made $ 26.40 so far, and that was within the first few days. Since then, nothing! So I'm not a guru, but I am here to tell you what I've learned.

I've bought three products in the last three weeks:

  • A Cost Per Action (CPA) Pay Per View (PPV) system,
  • A web page template system, and
  • A traffic generation system.

What I bought does not matter, but here's what I've learned. These systems are good, and I've no doubt that they're going to work when I get them all tuned up. One warning though, these systems sell flat out so do not expect a personal response to your questions. These guys have email engines set up to deal with the sales process. They're not sitting at their desk serving your questions very often. Face it, they've made it already and they're out on the beach!

Lessons I've taken from the last few weeks:

  • There is no instant money system, everything needs setting up and that takes time and money;
  • After your first purchase you will always be upsold, always; And
  • You are going to have to do some homework, there are some things you'll have to learn for yourself.

It Costs Money and There's Always More

Typically here's what will happen. You'll see an advertisement for a 'sure thing' marketing system. You'll watch a very reliable video, and you'll decide to spend the first $ 40 – 60.00. Once you've bought the system, you'll be offered a set of 'copy and paste' campaigns that you can put to work right away, then another bonus that will save you months and months of learning on your own. Within 20 minutes you'll have spent over $ 500.00. Next, you'll discover that you need to set up an account with a CPC network, or a PPV network; And that you need to register a domain. This will all cost you more before anything starting to offer your advertisements, or sell a thing. Nothing for it really, but to knuckle down, persevere and do the work. Be prepared to fund some set up costs, and feed the networks until you've learned what works! It does not need to be expensive, but it will require some time and funding.

Buy In Steadyly

The good news is that you can buy in for just the initial sign up fee, usually of $ 75 or less. The trick once you've bought that is to read the following offers carefully then decline them. Each time you decline, the offer will be discounted – up to three or four times more. Decline them and get started with the basic package. The first introductory lesson will tell you not to worry if you did not buy the special or the bonus, as you can still follow though and they'll be available to you anyway. Take the time to go through the training that comes with these packages and follow through with the required action. The lack of the bonus offers will not hinder your learning. Buy the bonus packages when you're set up and ready to use them; They'll be worth it then.

If you look at the detail on a lot of these pages, they're at least two years old and still selling. Compare the dates on the 'evidence' they present. Do not give in to the urgency of the offer. It's there to upsell you.

While I would not buy a system that has not got a money back guarantee, I'll treat that guarantee with some skepticism. Be prepared to ask for your money back though if the system is not performing for you and especially if the upgrade package is not available to you.

Summary

Getting into Internet Marketing is no different to getting into any other business, it costs money, takes time, and requires you to learn and apply lessons. You'll need to put time into setting up pages and systems. Dont let that knock you back though; While it costs money, it's not outrageous. Consider it an investment in a business, and you'll be on the right track; Think of it as the silver bullet, and you'd be better to go buy a lottery ticket!

Good luck. Get started, and stick with it. See you on the beach one day!

Forex Trading Education

Lack of enough knowledge on Forex trading by many people has led to them to failing to trade successfully. This has led to many traders investing lots of their money to ensure they get tips of how to trade smartly so that they get enough profits. Forex education has helped many to get the right information needed to trade. Different traders have adapted different techniques depending on the kind of business they are engaged in. The adaptation of any technique in the market depends on how long the trader wants to do his trading transactions per day. Some traders prefer to be in the market all day long while others will just come and go. For one to acquire proper education, it is good to how long you will be in the market.

Different traders have different aims when they enter into the market. It is good to start short-time trading when you are in the market. This will be a good way to know the techniques used in the market before you engage in the long day trading. As a beginner, it is not advisable to engage in day long business because the price keeps on changing. It is good to start with short time business so that you can monitor the prices and know the time to trade. You should know that in long business there is risk of getting loss. Quality education is good as it helps one to know how to make huge profits from the Forex game.

Forex trading education is also available on the internet. This has made it easy for traders to access important information which has assisted them to run their transactions smoothly. They have accessed data that has acted as a guide to them on how to do Forex trade. The internet has also given a good platform where traders can get information on how to come up with a good Forex business plan.

When you want to get information on the best ways to carry out Forex trading, it is good to avoid overspending on the same. Be aware of many conmen out there who are ready to milk people’s money and disappear. It is also good to be cautious so that you are not sold off fake Forex trading software. Be aware of the methods of the information in the software. It is good to seek the education services from trusted sources. Look for a provider who has been in the industry for a long time.